Today's DAR members are not about tea and crumpets

Today's DAR members are not about tea and crumpets

Daughters of the American Revolution organization focuses on historic preservation projects,...

'Hello Neighbor' introduces friends who haven't met yet

'Hello Neighbor' introduces friends who haven't met yet

The King City Welcome Committee sub-group plans a BYOB party every month King City residents are...

Equinox band is known for extraordinary performances

Equinox band is known for extraordinary performances

Gerry Craig started piano lessons 11 years ago and now leads a band When Summerfield residents...

1976 time capsule contents are revealed

1976 time capsule contents are revealed

Maria Gander's former fourth-grade students reunite to reminisce and learn what they 'buried' ...

Other Pamplin Media Group sites

INSIDERS (Sponsored Content)

Brought to you by Marcie Jones - Gentog - SENIOR DAYTIME RESPITE CARE INSIDER -


GENTOG - Marcie JonesWe all need a little inspiration. I’ve found that it is helpful to have a book or two on the bedside table that I can reach for when my spirits need a lift. Today I have 3 book suggestions for family caregivers.

Creating Moments of Joy by Jolene Brackey, encourages us to look beyond the challenges of Alzheimer's disease and focus more of our energy on creating moments of joy. We can’t always create a perfect day with someone who has dementia, but it is absolutely attainable to create some wonderful moments. This is an easy to read book, full of ideas and inspiration.

Color Yourself Happy was created by local artist Tara Reed. It is a coloring book for grown-ups who want to focus on being happy. Every picture has the word "Happy" in it. Just like in life, sometimes it is large and easy to spot and other times it's small and hidden. This book features 50 happy illustrations - 25 sayings and 25 designs. Coloring can be very therapeutic!

Bring Back the Fun by Marcie Jones is a compilation of ideas from my personal experience as the primary caregiver for my Gram, as well as the ideas that are used successfully every day at Gentog. The reading of this book is intended to be fun as well...it is written from the perspective of the person with dementia...mostly in the voice of my feisty Gram. You are sure to find several ideas that you can put to use right away. 

All of these titles can be purchased through Amazon.com. Life as a caregiver really can include the words Joy, Happy and Fun…find out how with these books.

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd #C5, Tigard, OR 97224

(503) 639-2600

www.gentog.com

Brought to you by Dr. Scott Johnson - Oregon Hearing Solutions - HEARING INSIDER -


OREGON HEARING SOLUTIONS - Dr. Scott JohnsonDo you suspect you might have hearing loss? Curious about the benefits of hearing devices? Long-time hearing aid user, but need to upgrade? This special opportunity is just for you.

As an audiologist, I’m always researching the latest products, trends, and innovations in hearing devices. But more than anything, I’m interested in how these hearing aids function in the real world.

With that in mind, I’m excited to announce a special promotion I’m offering exclusively through this column. For a limited time, I’ll be offering hearing screenings and loaning out the latest in hearing aid technology—absolutely free!

If you qualify, you’ll receive a complimentary hearing evaluation and custom programmed, state-of-the-art hearing devices for a one month trial period. The trial includes weekly check-up appointments where we’ll discuss how the hearing aids are performing and overall satisfaction with the product. Each volunteer will fill out a few brief questionnaires, and of course, all users of loaned devices accept financial responsibility in case of loss or damage.

That’s it! All I need is your honest opinion and feedback concerning your experience using the latest in hearing aid technology.

Why would I offer this program free of charge? Simple. I’m committed to providing the best solutions for hearing loss that work in real life. Guaranteed.

This program will only be available for a limited time, so don’t delay. Give us a call and take advantage of this exciting opportunity today!

Oregon Hearing Solutions

21323 SW Sherwood Blvd, Sherwood, Oregon 97140

(503) 625-4111

www.oregonhearing.com

Brought to you by Marcie Jones - Gentog - SENIOR DAYTIME RESPITE CARE INSIDER -


GENTOG - Marcie JonesProviding care to your spouse is an act of love and sacrifice. It does not, however, need to be 24 hours per day, every day, to be a true act of love. You can—and should—find time to replenish your soul.

If you never take time for you, there will be nothing left of you to give. Your tenderness, your kindness and your love will begin to lose the battle to impatience and resentment. Without intending to, you’ll stop providing loving care and begin to feel burdened. And he will sense that. Neither of you will be happy.

Finding an alternative for even a few hours a week will make a difference. Studies show that caregivers need at LEAST four hours per week to do something that they enjoy—that will truly replenish their spirit—in order to stay healthy. So how can you find that time? Get creative!

Start with family. Ask your children to come visit Dad so you can get away for a few hours. They might surprise you and say yes!

Ask your friends. Maybe your best friend’s husband would enjoy visiting with your husband while the two of you go to a movie.

Find a professional. In-home care agencies abound. Find one that you trust and make arrangements for a regular caregiver to come in and allow you to go out.

Find an adult day program. While you enjoy your time out, your spouse can actually enjoy making new friends, participating in meaningful activities, exercising and lunching with pals. Imagine that—BOTH of you could enjoy a few hours apart. Imagine how pleasant the evening could be after a day like that.

If you’re looking for a great place for your loved one to spend time while you take time for you…check out the program at Gentog. We’re here for you!

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd #C5, Tigard, OR 97224

(503) 639-2600

www.gentog.com

Brought to you by Dr. Scott Johnson - Oregon Hearing Solutions - HEARING CARE INSIDER -


OREGON HEARING SOLUTIONS - Dr. Scott JohnsonThe repercussions of poor decision-making reverberate far longer than our actions. This can be especially hard for younger folks to understand.

This message hits home after learning that Brian Johnson, lead singer of iconic rock-and-roll group AC/DC, can no longer perform with his band.

Johnson recently told CNN that he risked “total deafness” if he continued to perform in large stadiums and arenas. In a statement, he said that he already has difficulty hearing the guitars and other musicians on stage.

Johnson called his new diagnosis his “darkest day.” It’s a poignant reminder that we often don’t appreciate what we have until it’s gone.

The culprit? Sensorineural hearing loss. Damage to the inner ear caused by overexposure to loud noises is usually permanent and cannot be repaired, either by surgery or medication. But, like all forms of noise-induced hearing loss, it is entirely preventable.

Preventing sensorineural hearing loss costs as little as a pair of foam ear plugs. If you or a loved one are routinely exposed to constant loud noise over 85 decibels (about as loud as a vacuum cleaner), make sure to dampen those sounds or leave the area.

The good news? If you have already been diagnosed or suspect you may suffer from noise-induced hearing loss, there are excellent options and technology available to help you regain the sounds you’ve been missing. Give us a call to learn more about sensorineural hearing loss, how it can be prevented, or what to do after being diagnosed.

Oregon Hearing Solutions

21323 SW Sherwood Blvd, Sherwood, Oregon 97140

(503) 625-4111

www.oregonhearing.com

Brought to you by Dr. Scott Johnson - Oregon Hearing Solutions - HEARING CARE INSIDER -


OREGON HEARING SOLUTIONS - Dr. Scott JohnsonMay is Better Hearing & Speech Month, and Dr. Scott Johnson of Oregon Hearing Solutions is partnering with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association to help educate the general public and promote safe listening habits.

In honor of the month-long advocacy campaign, Dr. Johnson will also offer hearing aid product demonstrations absolutely free of charge. If you’ve considered buying a hearing aid before, or want to experience the quality and clarity of today’s personal sound-amplifying devices, now is the time to visit.

Of special concern to Dr. Johnson is the increasing danger faced by the world’s young people. A new study released by the World Health Organization reports that 1.1 billion children risk hearing loss due to unsafe listening habits.

Noise-induced hearing loss is entirely preventable—but it’s also irreversible. Parents can help prevent hearing loss by limiting headphone usage to one or two hours a day, enforcing “listening breaks,” keeping the volume on MP3 players below the halfway point and modeling good listening behaviors themselves.

“Parents who have any concern about their child’s hearing should schedule a hearing evaluation immediately,” Dr. Johnson says. “Early treatment can help prevent or mitigate many of the negative repercussions from hearing loss, so it is critical that parents not delay.”

Concerned parents can find more information online at www.identifythesigns.org. To schedule a hearing test appointment or for a free product demo, call or stop by Oregon Hearing Solutions today!

Oregon Hearing Solutions

21323 SW Sherwood Blvd, Sherwood, Oregon 97140

(503) 625-4111

www.oregonhearing.com

Brought to you by Marcie Jones - Gentog - SENIOR DAYTIME RESPITE CARE INSIDER -


GENTOG - Marcie JonesWhen you are caring for someone with dementia, they will sometimes react in an angry or aggressive way. As their caregivers, it’s up to us to figure out the trigger for the behavior in order to make things better.

Much like when infants cry, first think about the obvious. Are they in pain or physically uncomfortable (wet/soiled)? Are they uncomfortable with the noise level, the temperature or the amount of activity going on right now? Fix the problem, and hopefully the mood will shift.

But what if they are reacting to how they perceive you? An angry tone or even a stern face can trigger aggression in someone with dementia.

National expert on dementia care Teepa Snow teaches that caregivers need to practice five simple phrases that will acknowledge the person with dementia, accept responsibility, diffuse the situation and restore positive energy.

I’m sorry. I was trying to help.

I’m sorry. I made you upset.

I’m sorry the way I spoke made you feel bad.

I’m sorry that happened!

I’m sorry. This is HARD.

Any of these, spoken in a soft, kind voice, can do the trick. Next time you’re faced with anger from your loved one, take a deep breath and try one of these phrases. “I’m sorry” may be just the magic phrase that you need!!

To read more about dementia care, check out my blog at www.gentog.com.

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd #C5, Tigard, OR 97224

(503) 639-2600

www.gentog.com

Brought to you by Marcie Jones - Gentog - SENIOR DAYTIME RESPITE CARE INSIDER -


GENTOG - Marcie JonesOne of the ways I have navigated the care for my parents without feeling alone is by using Facebook. You may think of Facebook as just a silly program on the computer that kids use to gossip and overshare. I recognized the true value of Facebook as I reflected on two separate incidents with my parents.

Twelve years ago, my father had an accident that nearly killed him. That day, as I stood by my mom and worried that my dad would die from his injuries, I desperately needed to reach out to my siblings. They all live far away – and in three very different time zones (California, Virginia and Germany). Getting in touch with each of them and re-telling the story each time, was emotionally draining. They worried and wanted to be updated often, and that was not easy with poor cell reception and odd hours. I felt scared and disconnected, and I felt like all of the responsibility of care rested on my shoulders.

Two years ago my mother was diagnosed with lymphoma. I remember the dread that I felt and that intense need to connect with my siblings immediately. This time I was able to type in the news quickly –just once – and within minutes everyone knew what was happening and began supporting each other. Research began, and was shared. Calendars were checked, travel plans were made. Everyone knew who was flying in to help. Throughout the months of care, we all stay connected daily. Whoever was caring for the folks, kept the others updated. We faced the challenge together as a family, and we used Facebook messaging as our main avenue of communication.

The crisis is past (mom is in remission), but we continue to stay connected daily through Facebook. We share news of kids and grandkids, jobs and health challenges. We share family photos and funny quotes and ideas of all kinds. Sometimes we share publicly so all of our friends can see…sometimes we cry together in private discussions. That’s the beauty of Facebook – so many ways to communicate using just one tool.

As a caregiver, you are often isolated. Facebook is one way to stay connected with the people that you love…and that can make all the difference in the world.

"To read about other ways to use social media as a caregiver, check out my blog at www.gentog.com."

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd #C5, Tigard, OR 97224

(503) 639-2600

www.gentog.com

Brought to you by Dr. Scott Johnson - Oregon Hearing Solutions - HEARING INSIDER -


OREGON HEARING SOLUTIONS - Dr. Scott JohnsonHearing loss—the third most common physical ailment after arthritis and heart disease—affects over 48 million Americans. By age 65, more than a third of us experience some form of auditory impairment.

But despite its widespread presence, far too many hearing loss cases go untreated. In fact, more than two-thirds of those with hearing loss do not currently use a hearing aid. A new study, however, warns that untreated hearing loss may increase the risk of developing dementia.

Dr. Frank Lin, an otologist at Johns Hopkins University, released a study this January showing that the mental abilities of seniors with hearing loss degrade 30 to 40 percent faster than those with normal hearing.

The study tracked 2,000 men and women age 75 to 84 for six years. Those with hearing loss experienced increased difficulty with their memory and concentration.

Let’s be clear: just because you have hearing loss doesn’t mean you’re automatically going to develop dementia. In fact, there’s no direct evidence that hearing loss causes dementia, just that the two are connected.

But as an audiologist, I have seen firsthand how auditory impairment isolates individuals, breaking down the lines of communication between co-workers, family, and friends. Numerous other studies correlate loneliness and disengagement with dementia as well.

This is one of the many reasons why it’s more important than ever to treat hearing loss. Visit me at Oregon Hearing Solutions for your professional consultation today.

Oregon Hearing Solutions

21323 SW Sherwood Blvd, Sherwood, Oregon 97140

(503) 625-4111

www.oregonhearing.com

Brought to you by Marcie Jones - Gentog - RETIREMENT INSIDER -


GENTOG - Marcie JonesMany families in America now face having to care for a loved one with dementia.  Families are often separated by many miles, and the burden of care falls to one sibling more than the others.  This can be a tough dynamic.  Without good communication and a lot of love, this can be a disaster that separates siblings.  But it doesn’t have to be that way. If you are the child that lives several states away, you can still help! Here are some ideas of how:

- Schedule your vacations around Mom and Dad for now.  Maybe not every vacation, but at least once or twice a year spend some time with them.  Give your sibling a few days off while you take on the daily care.

- Call regularly.  Yes, I mean call every day.  Make it a habit to call Mom on your way to work.  Carry your cell phone on your evening walk and call then.  Listen closely, support your parents emotionally.  Let you know that you love them and have time for them.  And if you hear something different, pay attention.  You can be a caregiving partner from a distance if you stay in touch.

- Call your sibling regularly too.  Check in at least weekly to see how they are doing.  Do they need anything?  Do they need to bounce around ideas?  Do they just need to complain a little?  Listen, be supportive.

- The best gift my sister-in-law has ever given me were the words “You are the one that is there.  Whatever you decide, we’ll support.”  I AM the one that is here, and I see the day-to-day.  So I am the one that will likely make the decisions.  But it will be so much easier to do so knowing that my siblings have my back.

- Pray for us.  We need strength.  We need courage.  We need patience.  We need faith.  We need wisdom to make the right decisions.  Pray for those things.

Simply put?  If you can’t be beside us physically, be there for us emotionally.  We may be the designated caregiver, but this is definitely a family project.

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd #C5, Tigard, OR 97224

(503) 639-2600

http://www.gentog.com

Brought to you by Dr. Scott Johnson - Oregon Hearing Solutions - HEARING LOSS INSIDER -


OREGON HEARING SOLUTIONS - Dr. Scott JohnsonWhile disease, injury, and genetics can all lead to hearing loss, another primary reason most Americans lose their hearing stems from their continued exposure to loud noises.

Loud sound waves can damage or destroy any number of the 20,000 miniscule hairs inside each ear. That damage is permanent, but there is a way to augment and improve your hearing—visit Dr. Scott Johnson at Oregon Hearing Solutions.

With a doctorate degree in audiology from Arizona School of Health Sciences, Dr. Johnson has spent the last twenty-eight years helping individuals with hearing loss improve their sense of hearing.

At Oregon Hearing Solutions, he provides VIP customer service to all of his patients, including free continued care and batteries with every hearing aid purchase, cutting-edge technology from the nine top manufacturers, three-year warranties on all models, and the lowest price—guaranteed.

Dr. Johnson says the best part of his job is the satisfaction he gains from helping people improve their lives. “Hearing loss makes you miss out on so much, but with proper help, you’ll be amazed by how much more you are experiencing.”

Dr. Johnson and his wife Amy have lived in Sherwood for twelve years. They have two beautiful daughters, Clair & Hannah. As a proud supporter of the Bowmen, Dr. Johnson continues to sponsor athletics at Sherwood High School and is also an active member of the Sherwood Chamber of Commerce. To learn more about Dr. Johnson and Oregon Hearing Solutions, visit their website or find them on Facebook, Twitter, or Yelp.

Oregon Hearing Solutions

21323 SW Sherwood Blvd, Sherwood, Oregon 97140

(503) 625-4111

www.oregonhearing.com

Brought to you by Marcie Jones and Murt Bickett, Gentog - ASSISTED LIVING INSIDERS


Marcie Jones and Murt Bicket, GentogGentog stands for “generations together,” which represents the philosophy of intergenerational daycare — a space for both children and elderly.

“We provide daily care to seniors and to children,” says Marcie Jones, one of the founders, “and in doing so we serve the middle generations responsible for them.”

Jones and co-founder Murt Bickett were inspired to start Gentog based on Bickett’s love of children and Jones’ experience working with the elderly. After attending workshops from others who specialize in intergenerational programs, they opened Gentog in April 2008 with four staff members.

The Tigard location serves more than 125 families, including about 30 children and 30 seniors each day. They now employ 22 people, including childcare and elder care experts.

The seniors include people with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, MS, and people recovering from strokes, cancer, and other diseases. Gentog provides nutrition, medication reminders, and hygiene assistance.

Children from infants to 5-year-olds are accepted for the childcare program.

The children and seniors each have their own suite of rooms, and the two groups join in a central room several times a day for crafts, music, and other activities. There is also an outdoor space where children can play and the seniors can watch from the comfort of easy chairs.

“You know how often a child will call out ‘Watch me!’” says Jones. “In this setting there is always someone there to watch and cheer and laugh.”

Bickett and Jones live their Christian faith through their belief that multigenerational interaction keeps people of all ages happier and healthier.

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd., #C5

Tigard

503-639-2600

http://www.gentog.com

Brought to you by Marcie Jones - Gentog - ASSISTED LIVING INSIDER -


GENTOG - Marcie JonesMany families in America now face having to care for a loved one with dementia. Families are often separated by many miles, and the burden of care falls to one sibling more than the others. This can be a tough dynamic. Without good communication and a lot of love, this can be a disaster that separates siblings. But it doesn’t have to be that way. If you are the child that lives several states away, you can still help! Here are some ideas of how:

- Schedule your vacations around Mom and Dad for now. Maybe not every vacation, but at least once or twice a year spend some time with them. Give your sibling a few days off while you take on the daily care.

- Call regularly. Yes, I mean call every day. Make it a habit to call Mom on your way to work. Carry your cell phone on your evening walk and call then. Listen closely, support your parents emotionally.

Let you know that you love them and have time for them. And if you hear something different, pay attention. You can be a caregiving partner from a distance if you stay in touch.

- Call your sibling regularly too. Check in at least weekly to see how they are doing. Do they need anything? Do they need to bounce around ideas? Do they just need to complain a little? Listen, be supportive.

- The best gift my sister-in-law has ever given me were the words “You are the one that is there. Whatever you decide, we’ll support.” I AM the one that is here, and I see the day-to-day. So I am the one that will likely make the decisions. But it will be so much easier to do so knowing that my siblings have my back.

- Pray for us. We need strength. We need courage. We need patience. We need faith. We need wisdom to make the right decisions. Pray for those things.

Simply put?  If you can’t be beside us physically, be there for us emotionally.  We may be the designated caregiver, but this is definitely a family project.

Gentog

11535 SW Durham Rd #C5, Tigard, OR 97224

(503) 639-2600

www.gentog.com


King City's Features

BARBARA SHERMAN - At a May 7 event to open a time capsule Maria Gander's fourth-grade class at West Tualatin View Elementary put together in 1976, she and former student Kent Lutrell look at magazine photos pulled from the box that students selected to show their lives in the future.
May 24, 2016

Maria Gander takes a detour enroute to becoming a teacher

by Barbara Sherman
She left college to marry and have five children before finishing her degree in her 40s Former Summerfield resident Maria Gander knew early in life that she wanted to be a teacher, but she took…
BARBARA SHERMAN - Miss Ellen, the Buttevlle Schoolhouse schoolmarm, welcomes Deer Creek fourth-graders into the 157-year-old structure for a lesson in learning in a one-room school.
April 28, 2016

A hard-knock life

by Barbara Sherman
Deer Creek students experience first-hand the difficult lives of Oregon pioneers After studying Oregon history this year, 105 Deer Creek Elementary fourth-graders on April 8 stepped through a…
BARBARA SHERMAN - Bonnie and John Dustin's King City home has an Asian flair that reflects their time spent living in Japan and traveling extensively through Asia.
April 28, 2016

Former wrestler works to bring sport back

by Barbara Sherman
John Dustin is dedicated to adding wrestlng at more colleges John Dustin's interest in wrestling as a Tigard high school freshman turned into a teaching and coaching career that later led to…


AL STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY, TUALATIN - The cast of 'Catch Me If You Can' includes (from left) Diana LoVerso, Fred Cooprider, Mark Putnam, Jayne Furlong, Ben Philip, Ted Schroeder and Rebecca Raccanelli.
April 28, 2016

Mask & Mirror presents murder mystery

by (none)
'Catch Me If You Can' plot twists are 'intricate and surprising' in fifth season closing show Mask & Mirror Community Theatre is closing its fifth season with an exciting murder mystery set in…
NORTHWEST SENIOR THEATRE: RON TENNISON - Bill Morris is a ladies' man as he strikes a chord with the female cast members.
April 28, 2016

Northwest Senior Theatre spring show on tap

by (none)
The venerable company's 25th anniversary production features audience favorites from the past Northwest Senior Theatre presents its upcoming show, “The Silver Season Spring Gala – 2016” in May…
PMG PHOTO: BARBARA SHERMAN - Curtis Tigard (center of table) enjoys the festivities with (from left) daughter-in-law Sandra, son David, best friend Bud Ossey and Dottie Buss, who helped organize the party, as KGW's Christine Pitawanich (left) films and Phil Pasteris (right) shoots photos at the Royal Villas party.
April 28, 2016

Curtis Tigard celebrates 107th in style

by Barbara Sherman
Three parties cap whirlwind week of festivities for beloved local resident Curtis Tigard celebrated his 107 birthday with three parties in April, and why not? A descendant of the family that…
BARBARA SHERMAN - King City Ceramics Club members (standing from left) include Nancy Duthrie, Bonnie Babbitt, Carleen Simmering, Nicky Kenney, Marie VanderWeele, Jean Heckler, Joan Norris, Roberta Wiens, Elaine Gelfand and Lynn Wolfe; seated are Jerry Wiens and Pat Boyd.
April 28, 2016

Creativity reigns supreme in ceramics club

by Barbara Sherman
Members enjoy 'sisterhood' as well as opportunity to learn from each other For about as long as the King City Civic Association has existed, King City Ceramics Club members have been molding…
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: ADAM WICKHAM - The Bruno family is fighting Holly's cancer together: From left are brother Connor, sister Emily, mother Heidi, Holly and father Rick; not pictured is sister Abbie.
April 28, 2016

Holly Bruno's fight against cancer is family affair

by Mark Miller
Deer Creek student and her family are amazed at support from friends and school district Life for the Bruno family has been turned upside down since last summer. Heidi Bruno took her youngest…
BARBARA SHERMAN - Sharon Hughes stayed with a green color scheme while shopping at Gardener's Choice with other Summerfield Garden Club members.
April 28, 2016

Sprucing up Summerfield

by (none)
Members of garden club make annual trek to Gardener's Choice About a dozen members of the Summerfield Garden Club made their annual jaunt to Gardener’s Choice in Tigard on April 11. They…

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